Please turn your device to landscape mode to continue

The Globe and Mail is excited to partner with Marc Serpa Francoeur and Robinder Uppal of Lost Time Media in presenting the interactive documentary The World in Ten Blocks. The story they tell is an enduring one, of Toronto's Bloorcourt neighbourhood as a welcoming place for immigrants from all over the world. The small business owners of the area who shared their lives with the filmmakers are the beating heart of the experience. But what is equally compelling is the new frontier of storytelling that is explored with the project.


The World in Ten Blocks arrives at a time when documentary makers are creating immersive online experiences that explore different territory from traditional narrative films. Situated somewhere between the cutting edge of virtual reality and the old-school elegance of point-and-click adventures, Ten Blocks drops users right onto Bloor Street on a sunny afternoon and allows them to navigate a curated tour of the neighbourhood. A plethora of videos, photos old and new and text are all woven together by the stop-motion-esque experience of taking your own walk up and down the street, stopping in on shop owners and absorbing the ambiance of being there.

Click onward to explore The World in Ten Blocks for yourself, and we hope you enjoy it as much as we did.

WELCOME TO

An interactive documentary by Lost Time Media that explores the diversity of Toronto's Bloorcourt neighbourhood through the stories of its immigrant small business owners.

Set your own pace. Each stop on your journey will last 2-5 minutes.

Walk by scrolling up and down, not side to side.

Get ready for sound!

About the Project

START

SCROLL

START

Toronto is probably the world's most diverse city.

Half the population was born
outside of Canada.

People from every country in the world
walk these streets.

Welcome to the ten blocks of Bloor Street
between Crawford and Dufferin.

Entrepreneurs from all over the world make this
one of the most vibrant parts of Toronto.

Cultures and traditions are
preserved, shared, and evolve.

Businesses thrive and fail.
Dreams are fulfilled or shattered.

Skip to
Pam's

Start
Pam's

At age 16, Pam left her family behind
in Guyana to work in the clothing
factories of downtown Toronto.

Get to know Pam

Move on